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A taste of Animac Cartoon 2015

Currently, when we talk about animation, it's inevitable to stop and consider the offer on television sooner or later. Far from the decades where youth programming was limited to the decisions of a group of executives focused entirely on selling merchandise, the current animated TV show market enjoys a freshness barely ever seen before.

Currently, when we talk about animation, it's inevitable to stop and consider the offer on television sooner or later. Far from the decades where youth programming was limited to the decisions of a group of executives focused entirely on selling merchandise, the current animated TV show market enjoys a freshness barely ever seen before. Finally conscious of the fact that creative freedom elevates artists, the main channels in this small world (Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, even the recently skeptic Disney Channel) are developing incredibly complex, experimental shows that masterfully elaborate universes of their own under groundbreaking, completely innovative aesthetics. Animac 2015 brings you a taste of it all.

 

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I've spoken about it before, but I find inevitable to start with the show that's still the main surprise of the year to me: Patrick McHale's "Over The Garden Wall", a highly conceptual mini-series formed by 10 episodes with an entirely closed character arc, exploring an onirical world as inspired by the origins of animation (homenajes to Betty Boop and to Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks's Alice Comedies are constant), folk art and XIX-century children's literature as by Dante's Divine Comedy. In less than two hours, McHale and his team elaborate something as special as absolutely remarkable, a walk through the terrors and insecurities of childhood under the filter of a non-existant-but-immediately-immortal classic children's fairytale. Animac invites you to enjoy its beginnings, "The Old Grist Mill" and "Hard Times At The Huskin' Bee".

 

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Regarding Nickelodeon, we must definitely highlight the world premiere of two unseen previews, "Harvey Beaks" by C.H. Greenblatt (creator of "Chowder" and one of the main writers in "SpongeBob SquarePants") and "Pig-Goat-Banana-Cricket" by brilliant comic-book artists Johnny Ryan and Dave Cooper. Both of them have been greenlighted to a full series and they promise to be the two most important future premieres for the channel.

 

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We cannot ignore either the immense work Rebecca Sugar, Ian Jones-Quartey and the rest of their team are currently achieving with "Steven Universe": their most recent episodes, in particular, explore with a particularly remarkable tenderness and masterfulness a group of themes that could even be considered taboo in shows not destined to children, and never seem to force that magic they constantly feature in every single aspect. Maybe their peak so far can be found in two jewels co-written by Sugar, the show's creator herself: the first one, "Alone Together", centers on the apparently well-worn topic of preadolescent intimacy in a way that, in eleven simple minutes, reinvents it completely and makes it seem new and fresh with such sincerity and simplicity that, as an audience, it's almost inevitable to connect and feel reflected in each and every small childhood moment, from the first social anxiety experience to the redescovery of a first love. The second one, "Lion 3: Straight to Video", I invite you to discover by yourselves in Animac 2015.

 

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Speaking of childhood, I must also mention Cartoon Network's latest show, the highly nostalgic "Clarence", which since establishing Spencer Rothbell as showrunner and head writer, has been turning more and more into a highly lovable exploration of children's idiosyncrasy, from bursts of imagination leading us to mentally run over an electric cable during a road trip until the wacky interacions as guests in a school slumber party. This last concept is explored in the episode selected for Animac 2015, the eponymously named "Slumber Party", in two charming intertwined subplots.

 

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Two indisputable classics of recent Animac Cartoon, "Adventure Time" and "Regular Show", currently already established as undeniably successful shows, also return to Animac Cartoon with never-before-seen Spanish premieres, which keep developing the insane universes originally created by Pendleton Ward and JG Quintel. In the case of the first, "Ocarina", written by Tom Herpich and Steve Wolfhard; explores the father-son relationship of one of our main characters in an unconventional way, while "Thanks for the Crabapples, Giuseppe", by Seo Kim and Somvilay Xayaphone; gives us access to a small road trip adventure by the Ice King alongside some of the show's lesser-known characters. The second one, on the other hand, goes all-out, no-holds-barred with a double-length special, "The Real Thomas", exploring the mysterious origins of the intern at the park where our protagonists work.

 

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Amongst local animation, we also find three episodes of "Horaci l'Inuit", future TV3 children's animated series created by Òscar Sarramia, born in Lleida, who will also give an incredibly interesting conference focused on the creation of his show. You can already read an exclusive interview with him in Animac Magazine.

 

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This Animac Cartoon section will also contain the pilot "The Loud House" by Chris Savino, originally created for Nickelodeon and recently greenlighted as a full series; the episode "Maximum Dennis" from tremendously successful show "Sanjay and Craig"; and the pilots for "Bot Bot", "Crónicas Elefantiles" and "Rudy The Cloud Boy". We're waiting for you in Animac 2015 so you can enjoy with us this taste of the incredible current TV offer!


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